Tuesday’s Theme Music

A dozen dreams and a dozen songs rock my mind’s caverns and cesspools this morning. Mostly old songs because I’m in the realm of being an old guy. Whether you’re old depends on not just your attitude but also your scale. When you’re twenty, fifty seems old. At sixty-four, I don’t feel/seem young to myself. I’m sure advertisers have a different opinion about it, as do people who are thirty years plus younger, right?

I’m reminded of my mother when I think of age. When she was in her late seventies, she and her fiancée (who was in his early eighties) often went out dancing. They especially loved the big band sound and swing dancing. But she complained about the old people. I told her that some might think of her as old. She replied, “I’m talking about the really old people, the ones who are almost one hundred.”

Thinking of old rock, and old Eric Clapton drifts into my mind on clouds of cigarette smoke. Eric Clapton is one of my rock heroes, you know. And, ‘lo, into my head from the crucible of thoughts emerged a little-known Clapton song, “Tearing Us Apart”. Done as a duet with Tina Turner in 1987, it didn’t receive much airtime, that I know. I came to know it because I’ve bought a lot of Clapton albums and watched him on DVDs. He’s played it a few times with Turner in concert. Today, though, I found a 1996 concert where Sheryl Crow is on vocals with Eric. I liked it and thought I’d share it with you.

Enjoy your day. Wear your mask.

Sheryl Floof

Sheryl Floof (floofinition) – American rock floofsician, sonwriter, and actor.

In use: “Sheryl Floof’s songs, “If It Makes You Hungry”, “All I Wanna Do (Is Take A Nap)”, and “Every Day Is A Time to Play” rank among her most popular hit singles.”

Monday’s Theme Music

Going into week three of isolation, I start thinking about changing things up.

My wife’s Y-exercise group have done some adjusting. Using Zoom, they’ve now reverted to their Monday-Wednesday-Friday exercise routine, although one hour later than usual. My beer group is considering the same thing. Having a beer with others, via Zoom, and having a chat about the news, checking up on one another, might be the change I need.

Overall, I am slooowly adjusting. I miss my long walks and solitude, and my coffee/writing routine. My wife noticed, “I don’t think I’ve seen you writing.”

“Well, I tried but there were too many interruptions. Cats…you…my brain, the net, the coronavirus.” She made arrangements to give me some ‘me’ time for a few hours in the office. That enabled some writing.

Other than that, it’s been reading, cleaning, and playing ‘puter games. Too much of the reading has been drawn toward coronavirus news. I’ve made it a habit (or a compulsion) to check on different states and countries, along with the overall sit, several damn times a day.

So, a change would do me good. That thought introduced the Sheryl Crow song, “A Change Would Do You Good” (1997).

I’ve been thinking ’bout catching a train
Leave my phone machine by the radar range
Hello it’s me, I’m not at home
If you’d like to reach me, leave me alone

A change would do you good
A change would do you good
Hello, it’s me, I’m not at home
If you’d like to reach me, leave me alone

h/t to AZLyrics.com

Wednesday’s Theme Music

Checking out a faded stop sign, I thought, man, that thing has lost almost all its color. If it wasn’t for its shape, I wouldn’t know what it is. So, yea for the shape of a stop sign, serving its purpose to let you know what it is in all sorts of conditions.

Winding along the road further down, I thought that I’d been on that road a few times the past week, chuckling to myself about it. Between that thought and the sign, the Sheryl Crow song, “Every Day Is A Winding Road” (1996), crept into my thinking stream.

Yeah, every day is a winding road. Few stay as straightforward as planned. I always think of going with the changes and shifts as, riding the wave of the day. I’d like to think the roads are taking me somewhere, but sometimes it doesn’t feel that way. Sometimes, I feel like I’m in the Dichotomy Paradox, where you keep going half the distance left to go, but never get to the end. In theory, it’s impossible because a journey would then take an infinite number of steps and never end.

Yeah, that pretty well sums up my publishing efforts.

 

Friday’s Theme Music

Today’s song arrived in the stream last night when I was thinking about change. Deliberate and focused change for people is often hard for all the elements of comfort and routine that our habits incorporate. It’s easier to do as we’ve always do rather than embracing a new way. These change require time, mindfulness, discipline, and persistence to see them through.

Thinking along those line as I walked through the back yard introduced the song, “Tulsa Time” by Don Williams (1978). It’s a country and western song, not generally my milieu, but I’ve lived in places back that catered to country and western music tastes, heard it, and picked it up. Then Eric Clapton did a few live versions of it.

I was amused but reflecting on the song, I conclude that “Tulsa Time” was a metaphor for trying and failing to change.

Well, then I got to thinkin’
Man I’m really sinkin’
An I really had a flash this time
I had no business leavin’
An nobody would be grievin’
If I just went on back to Tulsa time.

h/t to MetroLyrics.com

See? You’re trying to change; no one else knows. Who cares if you go back to what you were doing and how you were doing it? It was your choice.

That’s right; you’re in the driver’s seat.

I enjoyed this live version discovered this morning. Hope you do, too.

 

Friday’s Theme Music

Sheryl Crow’s song, “If It Makes You Happy”, streamed in as I talked with one of the house floofs this morning. I was telling them, “You know, it’s cold out there today. Not freezing, but below forty. The sun is just coming out. Are you sure you want to go out there?”

Boo, the cat, looked up at me and said, “Meow.”

“Okay,” I said. “If it makes you happy.”

And there it was. I figured in a little while, I’d look out and see Boo huddled against the chilly air and wonder, then why are you so sad?

Today’s Theme Music

…and some days, you get up, and you’re in this mood, you’re like…possessed by this restlessness, and you think, “All I want to do is have some fun. Is that too much to ask?”

Here’s Sheryl Crow singing about it. Really, it’s like an essay on a day at the bar, the car wash, and the people who are there. From nineteen ninety-four, “All I Wanna Do.”

 

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